How to Start a Freight Brokerage Business

How to Start a Freight Brokerage Business

About How to Start a Freight Brokerage Business

How to Start a Freight Brokerage Business

Want to start a freight brokerage business? Our startup guide will provide you with a clear roadmap to success. Available with or without our award-winning business plan software, the Freight Brokerage Business Startup Guide will put you on the fast track to small business success!

Although the United States may be shifting from a manufacturing to an information-based economy, there will never be a time when goods don't have to move. And since the majority of goods shipped in the United States are sent by truck, the role of freight broker is a crucial one: Without freight brokers, most of those goods would end up sitting in a warehouse or on the docks and never get to their final destinations.

As a freight broker, you can make good money, right from your home, matching carriers with shippers for a fee. It's a very easy business to start--there's no special training or knowledge of the shipping industry needed. And equipment costs are minimal--all you really need is a computer, a phone and a fax machine. Our guide will do the rest. We'll show you how to:

  • Locate startup funds and set your prices
  • Understand the legal documents you'll be dealing with
  • Find carriers and shippers
  • Market your services
  • Build your client base
  • And much more

Freight brokers fill a critical need in the United States, and there's always room in the industry for someone who can offer reasonably priced, dependable service.

Excerpt from this guide

The transportation industry in general and the trucking industry specifically are critical to the economic and social survival of local communities, the country and, indeed, the entire world. Think about the times major transportation systems have failed, either because of mechanical problems, natural disasters or labor conflicts. When cargo can’t move, the repercussions are serious and widespread. Store shelves are emptied, perishable goods spoil, factories are shut down, workers are idled—the list goes on.

The United States may be shifting from a manufacturing to an information-based economy, and technology is certainly impacting every business, but there will never be a time when goods do not have to move.

"Logistics professionals in the United States—shippers, intermediaries and carriers—have transformed the way we do business," says Robert A. Voltmann, executive director and CEO of the Transportation Intermediaries Association (TIA) in Alexandria, Virginia.

"In the process, our national economy has been transformed as well. Transportation has become a strategic asset. Inventory is now stored in motion as we have been able to move to just-in-time delivery. More goods are being moved and with more efficiency and reliability than ever before."

Take a look around your home or office. It's highly unlikely that you have much—if anything at all—that didn't reach you either entirely or partially by truck. The size and scope of the motor freight industry can be overwhelming. The good news is that there’s plenty of room for you.